FRANCISCAN FRIARS Office of Communications Province of St. John the Baptist

www.franciscan.org

August 23, 2018

(Shanghai summer)

John Boissy and fellow students went to Huangshan (Yellow Mountain) on one weekend excursion.

BY TONI CASHNELLI

This summer, John Boissy could have given his brain a rest. Instead, he took on the academic Olympics: He went to China and studied Mandarin Chinese.

Inspired by his Asian heritage and the desire to learn the language for ministry, Br. John took a class last year at DePaul University in Chicago. When he returns to the school next month, he’ll skip from first- to third-year Chinese thanks to his intensive summer course in Shanghai.

Asked to describe the program of study, John calls it “rigorous.”

And how. He and seven other students from DePaul spent seven weeks at Fudan University, immersed in Chinese culture, exploring Chinese landmarks, and learning the nuances that make Chinese so fascinating – and frustrating.

“It was one of the best experiences I’ve ever had,” he says.

Almost as pleased as John is his mother, Ying Boissy, a native of Taipei who moved to the States in 1989. A retired product researcher for Procter & Gamble, she’s one of more than a billion people – 20% of the world’s population – who speak Chinese as their first language.

PHOTOS BY JOHN BOISSY, OFMTop, John and classmates took in the Peking Opera; middle,“I just couldn’t believe I was there,” John says about being in big, bustling Shanghai; above, classmate Lauren tries the mango  juice in Nanjing.But for years the language held little appeal for John, raised in Cincinnati with Ying and with his American-born father, Raymond Boissy, a dermatological scientist at UC before he retired. “From the time I was a couple years old, we would go to Taiwan to visit my grandparents every three years or so until I graduated from high school,” John says. “I remember loving the food; I would always gain a couple of pounds.”

His Grandma spoke no English; Grandpa knew only a few words. “We couldn’t communicate verbally, but they always wanted to be around me. My mom really wanted me to learn Chinese, but it was all foreign to me at that point.”

That eventually changed, Ying says. “The more obvious time John regretted not speaking Chinese was my father’s 90th birthday. All three generations went back to Taiwan. John was the only one who didn’t speak Chinese. He felt like an outsider.”

Getting started

Anxious to learn, John signed up for Chinese Language at DePaul. “When I started studying, one of the most difficult things was listening skills. You would hear and learn words and phrases and speak them and write them.” But sentences and conversation were tricky.

“Tone is another thing to get used to,” says John, who describes the difference between a flat, high-pitched tone, a rising tone, a falling and rising tone, and a falling tone. Confused? Chinese has far fewer syllables than English, so tones help convey meaning. Change the tone of the word that represents “to sleep”, for example, and you’re saying “dumplings”.

As for characters, those intricate, elegant building blocks of language, John has learned about a thousand of them (there are thousands more). “Chinese characters evolved from symbols,” says Ying. Penmanship matters, according to John: “Each character has a certain order of strokes, what mark comes before the other” when you write it down. If a character has two sides, his mother says, “One side is always meaning and the other side gives you pronunciation.”

When John showed Ying the work he did in the second quarter of school, she was underwhelmed. “I learned that in the second grade,” she told him.

John persevered. “I started going to a Chinese parish in Chicago’s Chinatown.” And when he heard about an option offered by DePaul – “You could go to Shanghai in the summer to fulfill your second year of language” – he jumped at the chance.

PHOTO BY TONI CASHNELLITop, John with Zhang Li and Victor Ma at Huangshan. middle, a dish of dumplings (Shui jiao); above, John with his mom, Ying, in CincinnatiOverwhelmed

With 24 million-plus residents, Shanghai is one of the most populous cities in the world. “Being there physically is overwhelming in a good way, but a lot to take in. I just couldn’t believe I was there,” he says.

Prestigious Fudan is among China’s “C-9” universities, one of its most elite schools. John stayed in the International Student Dorm on a campus where more than 33,000 full-time students are enrolled. “I was one of two [from DePaul] in the second-year class; the other six were third-year students,” including his roommate. “I felt it pushed me to learn.”

Five days a week, students met for three-and-a-half hours. “We’d usually begin by going through a vocabulary lesson” and repetition drills with the teacher. “After that we’d go through three-minute skits [they wrote themselves] and make up sentences. Then we met with a ‘language partner’ for four days a week” to help with grammar and sentence structure. “We had afternoons and evenings to study. We were graded every week, with a quiz on Fridays.”

Did he ever think his brain might explode?

“Plenty of times,” he says.

Among “extra activities” were Tai Chi, Painting and Calligraphy. Weekends were free, “and we had two adventures out of the city,” one to temples and museums in the ancient city of Nanjing, and another to Huangshan, the mystical Yellow Mountain. “I love mountains and hiking. I loved going there.”

His mother visited last month, and his dad came near the end as John studied for final exams that were “really intense.” The teacher had them learn 120 characters on the spot. “We had to know grammar. They gave us a written portion; there was a paragraph to read and we had to answer questions about it in Chinese. We also had to write an essay. After that was an oral exam” on one of three topics the teacher had previewed.

How did everyone do? “The final grade is based on how much we improved and how much effort we put into it,” John says. “If that’s the case, we expect to get an ‘A’.”

Confidence

What was most memorable? “Definitely my classmates. We all got close and helped each other” on a demanding journey. In the beginning, “Even things I knew like names and ages, I was getting stumped on. By the end I was able to pick up more, understand more, and have conversations with clerks at checkout counters. I was more confident; I was able to say Chinese off the top of my head without having to prepare ahead of time.” When his dad came to visit, “I felt like a pro.”

Where this will lead remains to be seen. After graduation John, a talented carpenter, hopes to attend woodworking school in Boston. “I would love to use my Chinese in a parish or community,” he says.

The summer in China was life-changing. “One of my classmates and I were talking about languages,” John says. “We all express what we see or feel through words. When we’re able to speak to someone in a different language, it gives us a different perspective; we see what words mean to someone on a different side of the world.”

And what words mean to someone much closer – like your own mom.

A time for action

Speaking up: Above, Henry Beck, OFM; right, Pat McCloskey, OFMIn an open letter to Pope Francis written for the October issue of St. Anthony Messenger magazine, Pat McCloskey says he is “a Catholic heartsick about a crisis that continues to hemorrhage the Church’s credibility in all areas.” Read his editorial at: franciscanmedia.org.  Pat was interviewed for a video on the subject; it will also be posted at: www.FranciscanMedia.org.

“I believe we are all called to ask: ‘What is my part in healing my Church?’”, Henry Beck asked in a Sunday reflection for St. Francis Retreat House in Easton, Pa. Henry sees recent events as “a call to deeper ownership and responsibility for our Church together!”

 

  • Young friars gathered at Holy Name College in Silver Spring, Md.Thirty-six young friars from all seven American OFM provinces gathered at Holy Name College Aug. 7-10 for four days of prayer, fraternal fellowship and ongoing formation. This gathering of SPUTY (Solemnly Professed for Under Ten Years) included a presentation on changes and trends in American parish life, a discussion of the Revitalization and Restructuring process and a preview of next summer’s international Chapter of Mats in Taize, France. Friars received a self-assessment instrument to evaluate their physical, emotional and spiritual health. Guardian Walter Liss and the residents of Holy Name College hosted the event, which gave some friars their first look at the national postulancy program and a taste of the multicultural ministry at St. Camillus Parish and St. Francis International School. Thanks to Jason Welle of ABVM Province for this reporting; he and co-chair Bob Barko of SH Province organized the event. Attending from SJB Province were Colin King, Roger Lopez, Clifford Hennings and Richard Goodin.
  • Tom Speier, OFMTom Speier plans to cross another item off his bucket list Sept. 9 when he makes his first parachute jump with professionals from Start Skydiving in Middletown, Ohio. Eighty-six-year-old Tom will be joined by fellow skydiver Michelle Viacava, Province Nurse. We’ll be riding along to report their adventure.
  • Faced with declining circulation and rising costs, the 146-year-old Michigan Catholic will cease publication with its Aug. 24 issue. In November, the Archdiocese of Detroit will launch Detroit Catholic, a free online digital news website “designed to broaden our reach and to provide daily, engaging and timely news coverage of our local missionary activities,” according to Archbishop Allen Vigneron.
  • It’s back-to-school week at Roger BaconThey’re back! Yesterday Roger Bacon High School welcomed returning students as well as future leaders, the Class of 2022. But on Aug. 15 they displayed an attitude of gratitude, inviting men and women who work for the Village of St. Bernard to the cafeteria for a special lunch. “We are thankful to have such great police, fire, EMT, city workers and park workers in St. Bernard – we can count on them for anything,” reads the post on RB’s Facebook page. “The Spartans are proud to be members of the St. Bernard community for over 90 years. Thanks again for keeping us safe and our neighborhood as beautiful as ever!”

Creating ‘a culture of protection’

In the aftermath of abuse, what should we do with our anger?There has been a lot of grief and renewal these past two weeks.  Last week we heard the unexpected news that one of our younger friars, David Moczulski (62 years old) died after telling a brother that he was not feeling well enough to go to morning prayer.  His funeral in Pittsburgh was packed with people remembering his goodness and expressing their grief at his passing.  From there we drove to St. Louis for meetings to revitalize and restructure with the other five provinces in the U.S.

The past weeks have also brought news causing both sorrow and anger. The accusations against Cardinal Theodore McCarrick, if proven true, would be an abuse of both power and his vow of chastity. And there is the overwhelming evidence presented by the Pennsylvania grand jury report going back 70 years that 300 priests may have abused over 1,000 children.  As if that were not bad enough, bishops and church leaders are said to have covered up the sexual abuse – protecting the abusers instead of the children.  Those who promised to nurture souls bruised them.  Instead of taking care of the sheep, they took advantage of them.

James Martin, SJWhat to do with the anger we rightly feel?  Fr. James Martin, SJ, wrote an editorial in the New York Times called the “Virtues of Catholic Anger”.  Yes, anger is a virtue if used well.  Let’s acknowledge that we could use anger in ways that are retaliatory, vengeful, or even to turn it inward as depression.  It can also lead to a more insidious resignation that could lead to trying to bury our heads in the sand.  These ways are destructive and would only leave us captive to our own rage.

Martin suggests using rage to combat evil.  I think he’s right.  After expressing our anger, we can use it to work for real change: We can recommit to developing a culture of protection.  We can be vigilant for any situation with children that just doesn’t seem “right”, and we can report it.  We Franciscans pledge ourselves to continue to ask for outside lay review.  Praesidium is an organization of accredited lawyers, health care professionals and psychologists who review our files and actions.  We have a local Review Board of lawyers, judges and psychologists with whom we address our current accusations and remedies of justice.  We try to get help for any victim to address the wounds that some of our brothers have inflicted.  And we care for our brothers who have hurt people in this way by removing them from ministry, and offering our way of life that is a way of supervision, prayer and penance.

Sr. Dianne Bergant, CSAMy former professor from CTU, Sr. Dianne Bergant, CSA, offered a reflection in her column on last Sunday’s reading from Wisdom.  She notes that not taking the invitation of wisdom could lead to a life of complacency.  We might want to just bury our heads in the sand.  There are times when we would rather stay comfortably in the lives we have fashioned, in a Church and Order we would rather not reform.  It takes a lot of trouble to reform and renew and revitalize.  She says, “We could be satisfied to continue in ignorance.  It has served us to this point, so ‘Why fix it if it ain’t broke?’”  Why?  Because it is broke.  Because ignorance is not bliss, because we are brothers dedicated to the call of Christ, who tells us, “Go repair My Church, which as you see, is falling down around you.”

 

– Mark Soehner, OFM

 

 

Send comments or questions to: sjbfco@franciscan.org

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FRANCISCAN FRIARS Office of Communications Province of St. John the Baptist

PHOTOS BY JOHN BOISSY, OFMTop, John and classmates took in the Peking Opera; middle,“I just couldn’t believe I was there,” John says about being in big, bustling Shanghai; above, classmate Lauren tries the mango  juice in Nanjing.But for years the language held little appeal for John, raised in Cincinnati with Ying and with his American-born father, Raymond Boissy, a dermatological scientist at UC before he retired. “From the time I was a couple years old, we would go to Taiwan to visit my grandparents every three years or so until I graduated from high school,” John says. “I remember loving the food; I would always gain a couple of pounds.”

  • Young friars gathered at Holy Name College in Silver Spring, Md.Thirty-six young friars from all seven American OFM provinces gathered at Holy Name College Aug. 7-10 for four days of prayer, fraternal fellowship and ongoing formation. This gathering of SPUTY (Solemnly Professed for Under Ten Years) included a presentation on changes and trends in American parish life, a discussion of the Revitalization and Restructuring process and a preview of next summer’s international Chapter of Mats in Taize, France. Friars received a self-assessment instrument to evaluate their physical, emotional and spiritual health. Guardian Walter Liss and the residents of Holy Name College hosted the event, which gave some friars their first look at the national postulancy program and a taste of the multicultural ministry at St. Camillus Parish and St. Francis International School. Thanks to Jason Welle of ABVM Province for this reporting; he and co-chair Bob Barko of SH Province organized the event. Attending from SJB Province were Colin King, Roger Lopez, Clifford Hennings and Richard Goodin.
FRANCISCAN FRIARS
Office of Communications Province of St. John the Baptist